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Some Stack Exchange sites, such as Literature Stack Exchange, Science Fiction and Fantasy Stack Exchange, Puzzling Stack Exchange and Spanish Language SE, have (or had, as the case may be) a tradition of trying to identify the best questions and answers from the last quarter. These are contributions that may be posted on a blog or a Twitter account if the site has one; otherwise they are a nice collection of the best contributions made in a community.

In addition to identifying material that can be used to promote the site elsewhere, such a list of nominations can also be used to highlight high-quality contributions that did not get a lot of votes when they were posted.

So what are the rules?

  • Find great questions with great answers from the last quarter. There are 264 questions and another 460 answers to choose from.
  • You can nominate multiple posts per answer.
  • Some sort of explanation why the nominated post is particularly good would be worth adding. This can give future contributors an idea of how to write up good questions or answers.
  • We used to do the same in Spanish.SE for a while, and even give bounties to the top 3. – fedorqui Jul 9 '20 at 11:32
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    @fedorqui Thanks. I have added the link. Unfortunately, I don't have the reps to liberally distribute bounties on this site ;-) – Tsundoku Jul 9 '20 at 11:59
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It is always difficult to establish a restricted list of best questions and answers. Here is a small selection that reflects some of the content I liked the most this quarter.

This question, coming from a discussion on Spanish SE, asked about the origins of the expression "dernier cri" referring to fashion trends. This is a very personal choice, as I had a lot of fun researching old books, catching a glimpse of 17th Century France. I also love that this question originates from a discussion about another language, making a connection between several SE sites and underlining similarities between latin languages.

This question is a perfect example of: "is this acceptable for this site?" and I like this because it doesn't leave you stone cold. One may wonder how naming a wine is related to French language, and I, myself, wasn't sure about the answer, as I initially voted to close the question and then retracted. What I like about this question is that it showed a certain enthusiasm from an American person trying to use French in a creative way, and it seemed like people had fun commenting or answering it. In general, I like questions that are open enough to leave a bit of creativity from the answerers.

Some people are just passionate about French language, and sometimes it shows. Here, Pas un Clue answers a question about a specific usage of the subjonctive tense, giving a lot of examples and going quite deeply into the analysis of why some sentence structures can be useful in certain contexts. It gives a lot of details while remaining relevant, and I liked reading it a lot.

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